Vietnam War in the News is an edited review of Vietnam War related news and articles.

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'No event in American history is more misunderstood than the Vietnam War. It was misreported then, and it is misremembered now.'
- Richard M. Nixon

POWs - Prisoners of War - Vietnam War

34 years ago, Vietnam POWs released and returned to America   (Article no longer available from the original source)
Non sibi sed patriae, "not self but country", is often mentioned as an unofficial motto of the US Navy. Being a Marine, I have always been more partial to Semper Fidelis, but I have had the honor and privilege of serving in the company of Navy men for whom that motto is a way of life. My former cellmate in Vietnam, John McCain, is one of those men. On March 14, 1973, John McCain and hundreds of other POWs were released from Hanoi and began the trip home. I will never forget the feeling of relief and joy upon stepping into an American aircraft with my fellow countrymen to begin that journey home.
(hawaiireporter)

A Marine Vietnam War Prisoner of war to speak
A Marine Vietnam War vet and pow survivor James H. Warner to speak at the POW⁄MIA morning colors ceremony. Once his Naval Flight Officer training was complete, he volunteered for duty in Vietnam and was sent there in 1967. While deployed, he was assigned to VMFA-323 and flew more than 100 missions before being shot down just north of the Demilitarized Zone, on Friday, Oct. 13. "It was odd that it was Friday the 13th, the day I was shot down. My commanding officer, Capt. Richard Kerr, jokingly made the comment prior to my mission that it was a cursed assignment." Kerr lost his life that same day inside a bunker when it was hit with a katushya rocket.
(dcmilitary)

Vietnam war hero and Air Force Colonel remembered   (Article no longer available from the original source)
Colonel Laird Guttersen retired from the Air Force in 1974 after 33 years of military service. More than five years was spent in a North Vietnam PoW camp after his fighter jet was shot down. He was thrown into the spotlight in 1973 when he was one of nearly 600 POW's released in a much-publicized event referred to as "Operation Homecoming." A framed picture of him upon his arrival won a Pulitzer Prize. As a prisoner, his jaw and shoulders were dislocated and he spent more than two years in solitary confinement. "He would imagine himself on some beach or some place that was beautiful to him instead of where he was."
(kvoa)

1st POW Killed In Vietnam Is Given Honors, Medals
The Viet Cong executed Harold George Bennett 41 years ago, after he injured a soldier while trying to escape from a prison camp for the third time. Bennett was the first U.S. prisoner of war put to death during the Vietnam War. A fellow soldier documented his heroism, but recognition efforts stalled. Recently his family was presented with a Combat Infantryman's Badge, Vietnam Service Medal, Prisoner of War Medal and Purple Heart. "In the jungles of Vietnam, he displayed courage before and after he was captured by the Viet Cong. He twice called off helicopter pilots who were attempting to rescue him because he wanted to save them from being shot down."
(washingtonpost)